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All models were at least 18 years old at the time of their performance. 18 U.S.C. 2257 Record-Keeping Requirements Compliance Statement.
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Rock 'N Roll Heaven

Released Jun 01st, 1989
Running Time 90
Director John Stagliano
Company Evil Angel
Cast Tom Byron, Sasha (I), Randy Spears, Brandy Alexandre, Woop, Cheri Taylor, Rene Morgan, Donnie Dixon, Jeannie Pepper, Keisha (I), Sharon Kane
Critical Rating AAA
Genre Feature

Rating


Reviews

Sex and rock 'n roll themes work pretty well in diet soft drink commercials and Playboy videos. When it comes to making the two of them a workable commodity in explicit, adult features, well, you're better served with diet soft drink commercials and Playboy tapes. Why doesn't it work in the adult genre? I guess for the same reason that athletes trying to play athletes in movie or TV roles look so self conscious or stilted.

John Stagliano's Rock 'N Roll Heaven has very little story, and few real speaking parts. Woop, who's a for-real L.A. musician, is seen as an itinerant player of songs who kind of falls into a couple of sex encounters with Rene Morgan and Cheri Taylor. Otherwise, the main body of action is carried out in a rock club where Woop plays and the customers are engaged in wordless, Fellini sex tableaux. The sex kind of just happens – I suppose, all under the encompassing power of the music. But they're just here and there images, with note of the patented Stagliano buildup. Frankly, I was let down.

And that's a shame in a way because some truly sparkling videography (the alleyway mugging scene and some of the other night shots are exceptionally well done) establishes this feature. Rock themes aside, for my money, the best bit in the whole story is a beach-pickup segment where Stagliano aims the camera squarely on a sensuous, beautifully structured Fee Fee Bardot (I'd love to see Stagliano do the ultimate T & A bikini movie). That is what I call hot, and there, he seems to work best with what brung him to the dance. Otherwise, pretty good, but not a Stagliano classic.



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